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High School Equivalency Diploma (HSED Details)

The State of Wisconsin offers the High School Equivalency Diploma (HSED) as a second credential option. With an HSED, you can expect to earn an average of $100,000 more in lifetime income than someone without a high school credential. Without a high school diploma or HSED, you are more likely to be out of work and for longer periods of time than someone who has earned a high school credential.

There are five ways to earn an HSED:

5.05 Pass the GED tests, and complete the health, citizenship, employability skills and career awareness counseling requirements.

Health

  • successfully complete .5 high school credits in health in grades 7th to 12th, OR
  • receive a passing score on a state approved health test at a GED/HSED test center

Citizenship

  • successfully complete 3 high school credits in social studies or a government or civics class in grade 9th to 12th, OR
  • successfully complete a citizenship course approved by the state, OR
  • receive a passing score on a state approved civics test at a GED/HSED test center.

Employability Skills

  • successfully complete an employability skills course

Career Awareness

  • complete a career assessment and discuss results with a counselor or instructor.

5.06 Persons who have attained, or nearly attained, the 22 high school credits, but who have not graduated, may be eligible for a diploma from their local school district by earning the additional credits required. If the person is not able to obtain a diploma from the school district, he/she may be granted a high school equivalency diploma from the state superintendent.
5.07 Finish 24 semester credits or 32 quarter credits at a university or technical college, including instruction in any area of study you didn't cover in high school.
5.08 Complete a foreign degree or diploma program.
5.09 Complete a competency based program offered by a technical college or community-based group that has been approved by the state superintendent of public instruction as a high school completion program.

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