Industrial Systems Specialist

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Industrial Systems Specialist

Technical Diploma

26 Credits | 1 Years

Financial Aid-Eligible

New Richmond

Manufacturing

Graduates install, troubleshoot, program and repair electrical, light mechanical, and computer systems used in industry to control and automate machines or processes. The equipment that you will deal with controls machines used in manufacturing and equipment used to control continuous processes. Examples include power utilities, petrochemical and chemical, paper, plastics, municipal water and wastewater, food and beverage, pharmaceutical, renewable energy, and control equipment support by vendors and engineering firms.  

As a graduate, you can secure employment as Field Service Engineers, Automation Engineers, Instrumentation Technicians, Electricians, Control Systems Programmers, Control Systems Designers, Process Operators and Maintenance Technicians. 

Program Overview

Process and manufacturing plants need to employ technicians to keep their machines and processing running and install and maintain equipment.  With this one-year technical diploma, you will be prepared to be employed at the technician level or higher on industrial computer networks, programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and process instruments. You will have both classroom and hands-on laboratory instruction with several systems to gain an understanding of controller and PLC interfacing, control systems and network installation.   

Program Outcomes

Industrial Systems Specialist graduates will be able to:

  • Demonstrate safe practices and techniques
  • Perform installations of controls hardware/software/cabling
  • Perform programming and configuration of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and Distributed Control Systems (DCSs)
  • Integrate control systems
  • Troubleshoot hardware/software of PLCs, instrumentation and control systems
  • Develop system documentation
A student working on a computer in the industrial systems lab

Information is presented in a classroom setting and then applied in the lab. Equipment used in the lab is kept current to match what is being used in industry. You will learn how to install and set up a variety of common industrial networks. 

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High-demand job.

A student working hands-on in the lab

Hands-on education.

Close up of a hand working hands on in the lab

Industrial networking skills. 


Academics

Industrial Systems Specialist classes are offered at the New Richmond campus in a traditional classroom and lab format. 

Career Pathways

As an Industrial Systems Specialist student at WITC, you will earn a technical diploma that can be applied in its entirety to an associate degree in Automation for Industrial Systems.

Club Activities

You can join the International Society of Automation Club and participate in field trips and regional competitions. Other clubs include Veteran’s Club and Student Senate.

Unique in the State

There is no other program like this in Wisconsin. You'll gain a specific set of skills that employers in this field look for in an employee. 


Curriculum

Program-specific subjects covered include process control, instrumentation, PLC programming and supervisory control. Other classes include industrial networking, power electronics and supervisory and distributed control concepts.   

Explore the Curriculum

Featured Industrial Systems Specialist Courses

10631102
|
UGRD
| 2 CR
The Industrial Power Electronics course is a hands-on course dealing with the electronics that are used to control, power, and operate machines and processes in the modern manufacturing plant. The course includes the study and use of the oscilloscope and digital multimeter, thyristors, ICs, and AC, DC, stepper and servo motor drive systems. PREREQUISITE: 10605167 Electricity 1 or equivalent.
10631108
|
UGRD
| 3 CR
PLC Programming and Interfacing offers students a hands-on approach to implementing industrial control by integrating typical plant floor electrical components with microprocessor-based controllers. Students will learn to identify and connect field inputs and outputs; communicate with, and program microprocessor-based controllers. Students will also connect, communicate with, and develop displays for computer-based operator interfaces. PREREQUISITE: 10605167 Electricity 1.
10631109
|
UGRD
| 3 CR
This course gives students the opportunity to learn about AC theory, circuits, and control devices used in industry. The course begins with an overview of AC theory including resistance, inductance, and capacitance. The course includes topics on AC and DC motors, motor controls, and pilot devices. The student will engage in hands-on activities with real industrial components to enable them to recognize, select, apply, and troubleshoot industrial electrical control circuit components. PREREQUISITE: 10605168 Electricity 2 or equivalent.

Industrial Systems Specialist is Part of a Career Pathway

As an Industrial Systems Specialist student at WITC, you can earn credentials each step of the way. 

Download the Career Pathway Map

This is the program you're looking at.

Technical Diploma
26 Credits / 1 Year Full Time
Potential Careers
Field Service Technician, Instrumentation and Controls Technician (I&C), Electrical and Instrument Technician (E&I), Service Technician, Electrical Maintenance Technician
Range of Yearly Salary
$33,277-$36,750 annually
Arrow pointing down

You can continue your education to obtain an associate degree.

Associate Degree
70 Credits / 2 Years Full Time; 3 Years Part Time
Potential Careers
Control Systems Technician, Instrument Technician, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Technician, Industrial Automation Technician, Computer Technician, Network Technician, Controls Engineer, Automation Engineer
Range of Yearly Salary
$33,277-$58,000 annually
Arrow pointing down

Automation for Industrial Systems Bachelor's Degree

Lakeland University | UW-Barron County | UW-Green Bay |UW-Stout
Potential Careers
Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Project Manager
Range of Yearly Salary
$47,341–$64,480

Admissions and Tuition

WITC has a simple three-step admissions process that can be completed in one visit. Fill out the application form either online or at a campus, complete an assessment and meet with a WITC counselor. In the meeting, you'll discuss your goals and the counselor will make sure you're getting the most out of your education and the best bang for your buck.

Tuition and Fees

WITC breaks down the cost of education, so you'll have a good idea of how much your education will cost.

Financial Aid

Financial aid is available to help you pay for your education. It can come in the form of grants, loans, federal work study, military and veterans benefits, division of vocational rehabilitation benefits and scholarships. 

Learn More About Paying for College

Estimated Total Program Costs*

Industrial Systems Specialist

26 Credits | 1 Years

$3,680

$3,680 In Tuition and Fees


*Tuition is an estimate and does not include any miscellaneous fees for various courses, tools, books, supplies or uniforms. Program book costs are in addition to tuition and fees and vary depending on course selection and where the books are purchased or rented. 


After the WITC Industrial Systems Specialist Program

Upon completion of the program, you will an Industrial Systems Specialist technical diploma. 

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Transfer Options

Transfer your WITC credits to a four-year college in Wisconsin to obtain your bachelor's degree and beyond. 

View Transfer Options

Career Outlooks

WITC's graduates experience success. Learn more about the types of careers you can get after graduation.

View Career Options

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Gainful Employment

Established by the U.S. Department of Education, Gainful Employment is available to help you make an informed decision about which career to pursue. This required information shows data about how WITC's technical diploma programs that receive federal financial aid lead to gainful employment in recognized careers. 

Learn More


Interface Project Funding

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This workforce product was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration. The product was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The U.S. Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership. This is an equal opportunity program. The U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration has funded 55% of this project equaling $680,028. This is an equal opportunity employer/program which provides auxiliary aids and services upon request to individuals with disabilities by calling 711 or 800.243.9482 Voice/TTY. WITC is an Equal Opportunity/Access Employer and Educator.

Contact

Choose a campus to view contact information, or for general assistance, please contact us.

Rice Lake Admissions Contact

Sara Eckstein

Admissions Advisor

800.243.9482 ext. 5220

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Ashland Admissions Contact

Jennifer Bednarik

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800.243.9482 ext. 3195

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New Richmond Admissions Contact

Jodi Saliny

Admissions Advisor

800.243.9482 ext. 4339

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Superior Admissions Contact

Cindy Miller

Admissions Advisor

800.243.9482 ext. 6243

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